Networking Needs a VMware (Part 1: Address Virtualization)

[This post was written with Andrew Lambeth]

Our last post “Networking Doesn’t Need a VMware” made the point that drawing a simple analogy between server and network virtualization can steer the technical discourse on network virtualization in the wrong direction. The sentiment comes from the many partner, analyst, and media meetings we’ve been involved in that persistently focus on relatively uninteresting areas of the network virtualization space, specifically, details of encapsulation formats and lookup pipelines.

In this series of writeups, we take a deeper look and discuss some areas in which network
virtualization would do well to emulate server virtualization. This is a fairly broad topic so we’ll break it up across a couple of posts.

In this part, we’ll focus on address space virtualization.

Quick heads up that the length of this post got a little bit out of hand. For those who don’t have the time/patience/inclination/attention span, the synopsis is as follows:

One of the key strengths of a hypervisor lies in its insertion of a completely new address space below the guest OS’s view of what it believes to be the physical address space. And while there are several possible ways to interpose on network address space to achieve some form of virtualization, encapsulation provides the closest analog to the hierarchical memory virtualization used in compute. It does so by taking advantage of the hierarchy inherent in the physical topology, and allowing both the virtual and physical address spaces to support complete forwarding and addressing models. However, like memory virtualization’s page table, encapsulation requires maintenance of the address mappings (rules to tunnel mappings). The interface for doing so should be open, and a good candidate for that interface is OpenFlow.

Now, onto the detailed argument …

Virtual Memory in Compute

Virtual memory has been a core component of compute virtualization for decades. The basic concept is very simple, multiple (generally sparse) virtual address spaces are multiplexed to a single compact physical address using a page table that contains the between the two.

An OS virtualizes the address space for a process by populating a table with a single level of translations from virtual addresses (VA) to physical addresses (PA). All hypervisors support the ability for a guest OS to continue working in this mode by adding the notion of a third address space called machine addresses (MA) for the true physical addresses.

Since x86 hardware initially supported only a single level of mappings the hypervisor implemented a complete MMU in software to capture and maintain the guest’s VA to PA mappings, and then created a second set of mappings from guest PA to actual hardware MA. What was actually programmed into hardware was VA to MA mappings, in order to not incur overhead during the actual memory references by the guest, but the full heirarchy was maintained so at any time the hypervisor components could easily take an address from any of the three address spaces and map it back to any of the other address spaces.

Having a multi-level hierarchical mapping was so powerful that eventually CPU vendors added support for multi-level page tables in the hardware MMU (called Nested Page Tables on AMD and Extended Page Tables on Intel). Arguably this was the biggest architectural change to CPUs over the last decade.

Benefits of address virtualization in compute

Although this is pretty basic stuff, it is worth enumerating the benefits it provides to see how these can be applied to the networking world.

  • It allows the multiplexing of multiple large, sparse address spaces onto a smaller, compact physical address space.
  • It supports mobility of a process within a physical address space. This can be used to more efficiently allocated processes to memory, or take advantage of new memory as it is added.
  • VMs don’t have to coordinate with other VMs to select their address space. Or more generally, there are no constraints of the virtual address space that can be allocated to a guest VM.
  • A virtual memory subsystem provides a basic unit of isolation. A VM cannot mistakingly (or maliciously) address another VM unless another part of the system is busted or compromised.

Address Virtualization for Networking

The point of this post is to explore whether memory virtualization in compute can provide guidance on network virtualization. It would be nice, for example, to retain the same benefits that made memory virtualization so successful.

We’ll start with some common approaches to network virtualization and see how they compare.

Tagging : The basic idea behind tagging is to mark packets at the edge of the network with some bits (the tag) that contains the virtual context. This tag generally encodes a unique identifier for the virtual network and perhaps the virtual ingress port. As the packet traverses the network, the tag is used to segment the forwarding tables to only apply to rules associated with that tag.

A tag does not provide “virtualization” in the same way virtual memory of compute does. Rather it provides segmentation (which was also a phase compute memory went through decades ago). That is, it doesn’t introduce a new address space, but rather segments an existing address space. As a result, the same addresses are used for both physical and virtual purposes. The implications of this can be quite limiting. For example:

  • Since the addresses are used to address things in the virtual world *and* the physical world, they have to be exposed to the physical forwarding tables. Therefore the nice property of aggregation that comes with hierarchical address mapping cannot be exploited. Using VLANs as an example, every VM MAC has to be exposed to the hardware putting a lot of pressure on physical L2 tables. If virtual addresses where mapped to a smaller subset of physical addresses instead, the requirement for large L2 tables would go away.
  • Due to layering, tags generally only segment a single address space (e.g. L2). Again, because there is no new address space introduced, this means that all of the virtual contexts must all have identical addressing models (e.g. L2) *and* the virtual addresses space must be the same as the physical address space. This unnecessarily couples the virtual and physical worlds. Imagine a case in which the model used to address the virtual domain would not be suitable for physical forwarding. The classic example of this is L2. VMs are given Ethernet NICs and may want to talk using L2 only. However, L2 is generally not a great way of building large fabrics. Introducing an additional address space can provide the desired service model at the virtual realm, and the appropriate forwarding model in the physical realm.
  • Another shortcoming of tagging is that you cannot take advantage of mobility through address remapping. In the virtual address realm, you can arbitrarily map a virtual address to a physical address. If the process or VM moves, the mapping just needs to be updated.  A tag however does not provide address mobility.  The reason that VEPA, VNTAG, etc. support mobility within an L2 domain is by virtue of learned soft state in L2 (which exists whether or not a tag is in use).  For layers that don’t support address mobility (say vanilla IP), using a tag won’t somehow enable it.It’s worth pointing out that this is a classic problem within virtualized datacenters today. L2 supports mobility, and L3 often does not. So while both can be segmented using tags, often only the L2 portion allows mobility confining VMs to a given subnet. Most of the approaches to VM mobility across subnets introduce another layer of addressing, whether this is done with LISP, tunnels, etc. However, as soon as encapsulation is introduced, it begs the question of why use tags at all.

There are a number of other differences between tagging and address-level virtualization (like requiring all switches en route to understand the tag), but hopefully you’ve gotten the point. To be more like memory virtualization, a new addressing layer needs to be present, and segmenting the physical address space doesn’t provide the same properties.

Address Mapping : Another method of network virtualization is address mapping. Unlike tagging, a new address space is introduced and mapped onto the physical address space by one or more devices in the network. The most common example of address mapping is NAT, although it doesn’t necessarily have to be limited to L3.

To avoid changing the framing format of the packet, address mapping operates by updating the address in place, meaning that the same field is used for the updated address. However, multiplexing multiple larger address spaces onto a smaller physical address space (for example, a bunch of private IP subnets onto a smaller physical IP subnet) is a lossy operation and therefore requires additional bits to map back from the smaller space to the larger space.

Here in lies much of the complexity (and commensurate shortcoming) of address mapping. Generally, the additional bits are added to a smaller field in the packet, and the full mapping information is stored as state on the device performing translation. This is what NAT does, the original 5 tuple is stashed on the device, and the ephemeral transport port is used to launder a key that points back to that 5 tuple on the return path.

When compared to virtual memory, the model doesn’t hold up particularly well. Within a server, the entire page table is always accessible, so addresses can be mapped back and forth with some additional information to aid in the demultiplexing (generally the pid). With network address translation, the “page table” is created on demand, and stored in a single device. Therefore, in order to support component failover of asymmetric paths, the per-flow state has to be replicated to all other devices that could be on the alternate path.  Also, because state is set up during flow initiation from the virtual address, inbound flows cannot be forwarded unless the destination public IP address is effectively “pinned”  to a virtual address.  As a result, virtual to virtual communication in which the end points are behind different devices have to resort to OOB techniques like NAT punching in order to communicated.

This doesn’t mean that addressing mapping isn’t hugely useful in practice. Clearly for mapping from a virtual address space to a physical address space this is the correct approach. However, if communicating from a virtual address to a virtual address through a physical address space, it it is far more limited than its compute analog.

Tunneling : By tunneling we mean that the payload of a packet is another packet (headers and all).

Like address mapping (and virtual memory) tunneling introduces another address space. However, there are two differences. First, the virtual address space doesn’t have to look anything like the physical. For example, it is possible to have the virtual address space be IPv6 and the physical address space be IPv4. Second, the full address mapping is stored in the packet so that there is no need to create per-flow state within the network to manage the mappings.

Tunneling (or perhaps more broadly encapsulation) is probably the most popular method of doing full network virtualization today. TRILL uses L2 in L2, LISP uses encapsulation, VXLAN (which is LISP as far as I can tell) uses L2 in L3, VCDNI uses L2 in L2, NVGRE uses L2 in L3, etc.

The general approach maps to virtual memory pretty well. The outer header can be likened to a physical address. The inner header can be likened to a virtual address. And often a shim header is included just after the outer header that contains demultiplexing information (the equivalent of a PID). The “page table” consists of on-datapath table table entries which map packets to tunnels.

Take for example an overlay mesh (like NVGRE). The L2 table at the edge that points to the tunnels is effectively mapping from virtual addresses to physical addresses. And there is no reason to limit this lookup to L2, it could provide L2 and L3 in the virtual domain. If a VM moves, this “page table” is updated as it would be in a server of a process is moved.

Because the packets are encapsulated, switches in the “physical domain” only have to deal with the outer header greatly reducing the number of addresses they have to deal with. Switches which contain the “page table” however, have to do lookups in the virtual world (e.g. map from packet to tunnel), map to the physical world (throw a tunnel on the packet) and then forward the packet in the physical world (figure out which port to send the tunneled traffic out on). Note that these are effectively the same steps an MMU takes within a server.

Further, like memory virtualization, tunneling provides nice isolation properties. For example, a VM in the virtual address space cannot address the physical network unless the virtual network is somehow bridged into it.

Also, like hierarchical memory, it is possible for the logical networks to have totally different forwarding stacks. One could be L2-only, the other ipv4, and another ipv6, and all of these could differ from the physical substrate. A common setup has IPv6 run in the virtual domain (for end-to-end addressing), and IPv4 for the physical fabric (where a large address space isn’t needed).

Fortunately, we already have a a multi-level hierarchical topology in the network (in particularly the datacenter). This allows for either the addition of a new layer at the edge which provides a virtual address space without changing any other components, or just changing the components at the outer edge of the hierarchy.

So what are the shortcomings of this approach? The most immediate are performance issues with tunneling, additional overhead overhead in the packet, and the need to maintain the distributed “page table”.

Tunneling performance is no longer the problem it use to be. Even from software in the server, clever tunnel implementations are able to take advantage of LRO and the like and can achieve 10G performance without much CPU. Hardware tunneling on most switching chipsets performs at line rate as well. Header overhead marginally increases transmission delay, and will reduce total throughput if a link is saturated.

Keeping the “page tables” up to date on the other hand is still something the industry is grappling with. Most standards punt on describing how this is done, or even the interface to use to write to the “page table”. Some piggyback on L2 learning (like NVGRE) to construct some of the state but still rely on an out of band mechanism for other state (in the case of NVGRE the VIF to tenantID mapping).

As we’ve said many times in the past, this interface should be standardized if for no other reason than to provide modularity in the architecture. Not doing that would be like limiting a hardware MMU on a CPU to only work with a single Operating System.

Fortunately, Microsoft realizes this need and has opened the interface to their vswitch on Windows Server 8, and XenServer, KVM and other Linux-based hypervisors support Open vSwitch.

For hardware platforms it would also be nice to expose the ability to manage this state. Of course, we would argue that OpenFlow is a good candidate if for no other reason than it has been already used for this purpose successfully.

Wrapping Up ..

If the analogy of memory virtualization in compute holds then encapsulation is the correct way to go about network virtualization. It introduces a new address space that is unrestricted in forwarding model, it takes advantage of hierarchy inherent in the physical topology allowing for address aggregation further up in the hierarchy, and it provides the basic virtualization properties of isolation and transparent mobility.

In the next post of this series, we’ll explore how server virtualization suggests that the way that encapsulation is implemented today isn’t quite right, and some things we may want to do to fix it.


9 Comments on “Networking Needs a VMware (Part 1: Address Virtualization)”

  1. vmsec says:

    BTW – VMware is not spelled VMWare.

    http://www.vadapt.com/2009/05/spelling-vmware-or-vmware-or-vmware-or-vmware/

    And what do you think of organizations getting their own MAC Address space OUI from IEEE?

    Seems there may be some benefit as the scale of cloud based network stacks expands.

    • Hey there Iben. Thanks for pointing out the spelling mistake, fixed.

      Getting an OUI and centrally assigning MACs is a reasonable solution for avoiding conflicts. However, the existing allocated OUI space is probably large enough that there is a usable chunk you can crib without the danger of conflicting with a physical device.

  2. Ant says:

    Your IPv6 assignment is probably large enough to give all the VMs you can create in a lifetime a unique address.

    • Andrew Lambeth says:

      The problem isn’t that there aren’t enough addresses, it is that they are to be managed and assigned by unrelated administrative domains (Coke and Pepsi both hosting virtual datacenters at a cloud provider for example). Even if you have some sort of coordination enforced within a given physical site, you can’t handle the case where VMs are migrated in with existing addresses.

  3. [...] a blog entry entitled “Networking Needs a VMWare (Part 1: Address Virtualization)” appeared on Martin Cassado’s blog which tries to make a case for comparing the memory [...]

  4. Bhala says:

    Interesting analogy. However, article does not explain what the goal of network virtualization is. The virtual memory of computer and virtual machine (VMware style) are two different things and came in to existence for different reasons/goals.
    Virtual memory is around for long time and one of the many goals is to hide the available physical memory from the programmer so that he/she can write programs that run on computers with different amounts of physical memory.
    Goal of virtual machine is quite different. It gives the ability to better manage hardware resources.
    What is the goal of network virtualization ?

    • There are a number of use cases for network virtualization that are deployed today. Two of the more common are (a) decouple the service model and end-to-end addressing model from the physical fabric: For example, this allows building a very simple ipv4 physical fabric yet allowing end hosts to have an L2 service model and IPv6 (b) Transparent mobility: allow mobility of a VM, or a full virtual network, without disrupting in-network policy, available services, or end addressing.

  5. wshen0123 says:

    Nice post!

    I think there are two things difference between memory address virtualization and network address virtualizaion. I will use those for abbr.

    virtual/physical memory address: VMA/PMA.
    virtual network address: VNA.

    1) We don’t need to maintain a reverse mapping of VMA->PMA when translating them into physical address. It’s uni-directional, because the way CPU or DMA access works. While for VNA, we need to deal with packets coming in and out. So it’s bi-directional and a bit harder to make it as fast as TLB.

    2) We don’t need to maintain VMA in the PMA bits. While for network virtualization, we have to keep the VMA info in the packet so that the other end knows the virtual source. This adds to another overhead that makes the direct address-mapping scheme that you mentioned impossible. So we actually need such encapsulated solution like GRE, VxLAN.


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